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The Hammersmith Highline

 
 
 
 
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The Hammersmith Highline

From carefully managed botanical gardens, to proudly cultivated allotments and collectively curated community gardens, London has a long history of both public and private green spaces. Since the First World War railway land has been used for allotment gardens. As the city becomes ever denser,now would seem the time to re-awaken this history. A greenhouse with its light glass veil to the outside and a rich internal world would be just such a space. Our proposal is focused on the central part of the viaduct as this presents the opportunity for access at both ends. Forming a loop, a well connected and vibrant public space is created.

 
 
 
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From carefully managed botanical gardens, to proudly cultivated allotments and collectively curated community gardens London has a long history of both public and private green spaces. Ranging in privacy, size and level of interaction. These gardens play an important role in the urban fabric of London and have played an important role in the way London and its inhabitants interact. As the garden and the community around it develops there is the opportunity to extend the proposal both east and west to make use of the full length of the viaduct.

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The architecture of the greenhouse draws on the language of railway infrastructure. The main structural element is a series of Belfast trusses. Their lattice webs create associations to the railway, reinterpreted to draw on the delicacy of a garden trellis. Wrapping around the structure is needed and translucent glass, letting in lots of light while gently blurring and softening the relationship to the outside.